IPG Children's Publisher of the Year

Happy Hallowe'en from Nosy Crow!

Posted by Tom on Oct 31, 2014

Hallowe’en is here – and we have some FANTASTICALLY spooky books for all ages, with witches, magic, pumpkins, and monsters and galore. There’s something for everyone! If you’d like to celebrate with some excellent hallowe’en reading, here’s what you can find in bookshops today.

We’ve just published Witchworld by Emma Fischel – the first volume in an exciting new series for 9+ year olds. Flo is a thoroughly modern witch girl – she has a spell stick, travels in her sky rider, and wouldn’t know a cauldron if she fell into one. But when her grandmother turns up on an actual broomstick, warning that ghouls are about to attack Witchworld, Flo realises that everything she’s been told about being a witch is just hocus pocus – and she soon finds herself involved in a thrilling adventure where old witchcraft and modern witchtech collide, with dramatic results…

With an ingeniously imaginative story from Emma, stunning cover artwork from Ottoline creator Chris Riddell, and a brilliantly bewitching new heroine in Flo, this is a fabulous foray into fantastical fiction for older readers – Sabrina with a smartphone! The Times have named it their Children’s Book of the Week, and described it as “fresh and fun”.

Here’s a look inside Witchworld:


Buy the book online.

For younger readers, Vulgar the Viking and the Spooky School by Odin Redbeard would make the perfect Hallowe’en read. Vulgar can’t wait for the school trip, to learn all about hunting and exploring and having adventures. But after a very VERY long walk and a tea of roasted slugs, Vulgar’s not so chipper. It’s getting dark, and he’s a bit spooked. There are trolls in these hills…

Here’s a look inside the book:


Buy the book online.

And for newly independent readers with a thirst for magic and mayhem, Hubble Bubble: The Super-Spooky Fright Night – the third young fiction title from Tracey Corderoy and Joe Berger, the creators of the highly-acclaimed Hubble picture books – will go down a treat. In this collection of three illustrated stories, Granny’s halloween party goes off with a bang, a birthday trip to a build-a-teddy factory careers out of control, and well, you can probably guess who magics up penguins at the local swimming pool!

Here’s a look inside The Super-Spooky Fright Night:


Buy the book online.

And, of course, the Hubble Bubble picture books would make EQUALLY suitable Hallowe’en reading – if you’ve not discovered the series before, start with Hubble Bubble, Granny Trouble, the very first story all about the little girl whose granny is (whisper it) a witch.

Here’s a look inside Hubble Bubble, Granny Trouble:


Buy the book online.

For young children who are still new to school, you can’t go wrong with Mouse’s First Night at Moonlight School by Simon Puttock and Ali Pye, a sublimely illustrated and gently reassuring new picture book. It’s Mouse’s first day at Miss Moon’s Moonlight School for the wee, small creatures of the night – but she’s a little shy. Wherever can she be? Inside the paint pots? On the tops of cupboards? Under a pile of special leaves?

Here’s a look inside the book:


Buy the book online.

And for very little ones, Wickle Woo has a Halloween party! by Jannie Ho would be absolutely ticket-boo. Designed for the smallest of hands, with wonderfully satisfying tabs and sliders, this robust, colourful board book will delight little readers again and again. You can read about some of Jannie’s fantastic Wickle Woo craft activities (and learn how to make your own!) here.


Buy the book online.

And, don’t forget – there are some fantastically spooky hallowe’en jigsaws, with artwork from lots of our books an apps, in our free jigsaw app, Nosy Crow Jigsaws! Here’s a quick preview of the app:

Happy Hallowe’en from all of us at Nosy Crow!

There are only a couple of days left to help Nosy Crow win the O2 Smarta 100 Business of the Year Award

Posted by Tom on Oct 30, 2014

A little while ago (just as the Frankfurt Book Fair was beginning, in fact), we blogged that Nosy Crow had been named a Smarta 100 Winner… and that we needed your help.

We’re one of the 10 winners in the “Most Innovative Business” category – and the overall winner of each category, and the O2 Smarta 100 Business of the Year, is decided by public vote.

And now – while Will works on Snow White; Ola steadily ploughs through Frankfurt follow-up; Kate trudges round New York with 23 kilos of books in a suitcase; I’m in a studio recording our next iBooks and apps; and everyone else does all the stuff we do every day to make our small independent company a success – we are asking again for your vote – the polls close at the weekend.

If you haven’t already done so, please do consider voting for us – we’d be incredibly grateful for your support. It takes 30 seconds, and you can vote for Nosy Crow here.

(If you want to know how we’re doing, you can see the results of the most recent votes here.)

Thank you, in advance, from all of us!

Come to the November Nosy Crow Reading Group - we're reading Flora and Ulysses

Posted by Tom on Oct 29, 2014

Would you like to come to the next Nosy Crow Reading Group?

In November we’ll be discussing the Newbery Medal-winning Flora and Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo, which Kirkus described as “original, touching and oh-so-funny”.

We’ll be meeting on Wednesday, November 19 at 6.30pm, here at the Nosy Crow offices – 10a Lant Street, London, SE1 1QR. If you’d like to come to the physical event at our office in London, send an email to tom at nosycrow dot com and we’ll try to fit in as many people as possible. If we can’t save a place for you this time, we can, if you’d like, keep you on our waiting list for cancellations and add you to our mailing list for future events.

You can order the book online from Waterstones here – and watch a trailer for the book at the top of this post.

If you can’t make it here, we’d love for you to join in online, either on Twitter with the #NCGKids hashtag, or in the comments section of our blog for the evening.

We’ll post some discussion points for the book a little closer to the date – we hope you can join us!